In vivo protein crystallization opens new routes in structural biology
2012
Authors: Koopmann R, Cupelli K, Redecke L, Nass K, Deponte DP, White TA, Stellato F, Rehders D, Liang M, Andreasson J, Aquila A, Bajt S, Barthelmess M, Barty A, Bogan MJ, Bostedt C, Boutet S, Bozek JD, Caleman C, Coppola N, Davidsson J, Doak RB, Ekeberg T, Epp SW, Erk B, Fleckenstein H, Foucar L, Graafsma H, Gumprecht L, Hajdu J, Hampton CY, Hartmann A, Hartmann R, Hauser G, Hirsemann H, Holl P, Hunter MS, Kassemeyer S, Kirian RA, Lomb L, Maia FR, Kimmel N, Martin AV, Messerschmidt M, Reich C, Rolles D, Rudek B, Rudenko A, Schlichting I, Schulz J, Seibert MM, Shoeman RL, Sierra RG, Soltau H, Stern S, Strüder L, Timneanu N, Ullrich J, Wang X, Weidenspointner G, Weierstall U, Williams GJ, Wunderer CB, Fromme P, Spence JC, Stehle T, Chapman HN, Betzel C, Duszenko M
CellNetworks People: Schlichting Ilme
Journal: Nat Methods. 2012 Jan 29;9(3):259-62. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.1859

Protein crystallization in cells has been observed several times in nature. However, owing to their small size these crystals have not yet been used for X-ray crystallographic analysis. We prepared nano-sized in vivo-grown crystals of Trypanosoma brucei enzymes and applied the emerging method of free-electron laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography to record interpretable diffraction data. This combined approach will open new opportunities in structural systems biology.